Lesson 1: Maximize your visibility

One thing LinkedIn doesn’t tell you is that you are only as visible as the size of your network. Let’s have a look at the «three degrees» of connections (On LinkedIn, people in your network are called connections and your network is made up of your 1st-degree, 2nd-degree, and 3rd-degree connections and fellow members of your LinkedIn Groups.)

As an example, here’s my own current network broken down by “degrees” below:

Mynetworkoftrustedprofessionals

Tip 1: Find your own stats here: http://www.linkedin.com/network?trk=hb_tab_net

Tip 2: Get a cool map of your network at LinkedIn here: http://inmaps.linkedinlabs.com/faq

Now, let’s get back to the “degrees” above – what do they really mean?

1st-degree – People you’re directly connected to because you have accepted their invitation to connect, or they have accepted your invitation. You’ll see a 1st degree icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. You can contact them by sending a message on LinkedIn.

2nd-degree – People who are connected to your 1st-degree connections. You’ll see a 2nd degree icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. You can send them an invitation by clicking Connect or contact them through an InMail or an introduction.

3rd-degree – People who are connected to your 2nd-degree connections. You’ll see a 3rd degree icon next to their name in search results and on their profile.

– If their full first and last names are displayed, you will be able to send them an invitation by clicking Connect.

– If only the first letter of their last name is displayed, clicking Connect is not an option but you can still contact them through an InMail or an introduction.

Fellow members of your LinkedIn Groups – These people are considered part of your network because you’re members of the same group. You’ll see a Group icon next to their name in search results and on their profile. You can contact them by sending a message on LinkedIn or using your group’s discussion feature.

Out of Network – LinkedIn members who fall outside of the categories listed above. You can contact them through an InMail.

So for every connection you add, your network grows exponentially. (I.e, add me, and then all my number 1’s become your number 2’s!)

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Tip 3: So, if you are into logistics (and strangely enough still not linked up with me on LinkedIn), try out this little exercise:

First; check your network stats (see tip 1)

Second; add me by using this link http://no.linkedin.com/in/catohoberg/ (use the email address cato.hoberg@gmail.com if necessary)

Third; check your network stats one more time – see any difference? Thought so!

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Lesson 2: The more visible you become, the more you’ll show up in searches related to your tags, keywords and industry. You’ll soon notice a significant increase in the section ««Who’s Viewed Your Profile» in the right column of your LinkedIn homepage.

So, how does «Who’s Viewed Your Profile» really work?

The «Who’s Viewed Your Profile» feature helps you understand who’s been looking at your profile recently and how many times you have shown up in search results.

whoswievedyourprofile

You can select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile from the Settings page. There are three different ways LinkedIn show information on who’s viewed your profile, based on the profile viewer’s privacy settings:

* Name and headline.

* Anonymous profile characteristics such as industry and title.

* Anonymous LinkedIn user.

viewsbyindustry

You’ll see profile stats about who’s viewed your profile if you have a premium account. This will also give you access to Profile Stats Pro. You will also be able to see the profile stats if uou have a free basic account and have set your privacy settings to show your name and headline. You won’t see any profile stats if you have a free basic account and have set your privacy settings to remain anonymous.

Update: http://blog.linkedin.com/2013/06/03/check-out-whos-checking-you-out/

I hope these two lessons were helpful, and would love to hear about how you use LinkedIn as the powerful sales tool it really is!

Update: LinkedIns new graphical view of your viewers:

IMG_0807

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